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Video about the Club

Tabanus autumnalis
find out more... Tabanus autumnalis male 20150619-1900 Copyright: Phil Collins

Essex Field Club
Essex Field Club
registered charity
no 1113963
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We are open today

We are normally open to the public at our centre at Wat Tyler Country Park every Saturday, Sunday and bank holiday 11am-4pm. We are also open on Wednesdays 10am-4pm.
Early Summer recording Record Red-and-Black Froghopper Record Lavender Beetle
Record Stag Beetle
Record Misumena crab spider
Record Lily Beetle
Record Swollen-thighed Beetle Record Zebra Spider

Geology Site Account


St. Osyth Marsh (part of Colne Estuary SSSI), , Tendring District, TM100132, Site of Special Scientific Interest

 
 
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Summary

St. Osyth Marsh is an important site for documenting the changes in salt marsh growth, and is one of a few marsh areas in Britain to have been dated. It is part of Colne Estuary SSSI. The importance of the geomorphology of the marsh is included in the Site of Special Scientific Interest designation. The site extends from TM 090 144 to TM 130 126

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Site description

St. Osyth Marsh is an important site for documenting the changes in salt marsh growth, and is one of a few marsh areas in Britain to have been dated. The age of the marsh is about 4,300 years, the date provided by the analysis of a peat seam preserved in grey-black clay at the site. The characteristic assemblage of features - creeks, saltpans and salt marsh cliff - are all present here, and reflect the maturity of the marsh system. The saltpans have been intensively researched by geomorphologists, and provide much information relating to the formation and development of this unique coastal landform.

St. Osyth Marsh is also one of the few places in Britain where the development of wave-built protective beach ridges called cheniers has been described fully. Here the cheniers consist mostly of sand and gravel, unlike those further south on the Dengie peninsula which are made up almost entirely of shells. A rigorous study of the beach ridges at St. Osyth Marsh was carried out recently to determine their true form and origin using ground-penetrating radar and the results published in the journal Sedimentary Geology in 2003.

 

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Reference: Butler et al. 1981, Neal et al. 2002, May & Hansom 2003 (p. 531-534)

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