Essex Field Club on Facebook

Video about the Club

Xestia triangulum
find out more... Double Square Spot. Copyright: Stephen Rolls

Essex Field Club
Essex Field Club
registered charity
no 1113963
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We are normally open to the public at our centre at Wat Tyler Country Park every Saturday, Sunday and bank holiday between 11am and 4pm. We are also usually open on Wednesdays between 10am and 4pm.

Spring recording Record your Robin Record Common Frog Rana temporaria
Record Alexanders Smyrnium olusatrum Record Tawny Mining Bee Andrena fulva
Record Dark-edged Bee Fly Bombylius major
Record Spring Flower Bee Anthophora plumipes
Record cuckoo bee Melecta albifrons

Your Forum

This forum has now been more or less replaced by the Club's Facebook page at
Essex Field Club on Facebook




The weblog below is for naturalists to use to report interesting sightings, ask questions, report on field meetings and generally post pictures and any information or questions generally relevant in some way to the wildlife and geology of Essex. You will need to register and be logged-on to post to the forum, and you need to upload pictures first, for use in posts. Find out more


Fri 24th October 2008 09:46 by Ben Sale
Many thanks Peter, as I have just applied for membership, I look forward to being part of the Field Club. Regards Ben
link
Thu 23rd October 2008 22:21 by Peter Harvey
Sorry, my misunderstanding, and I certainly didn't think there was any intention to 'steal' information. Anything that can reach more people and encourage an interest in moths and other kinds of wildlife the better. I have added a link to your website.
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Thu 23rd October 2008 17:03 by Ben Sale
The website is only being done as a means of 'Spreading the word' abit, all of my records go to the CR which inturn gets logged. I do not intend to reinvent the wheel as is evident on my website, in fact most of the information is from personal studies and is abit more upto date on whats happening around Essex, catches etc (you could see it as a Blog almost!), as previously mentioned it is a work in progress and I have already purchased the book you mention and do not intend to 'Steal' information, just merely provide a personal database and account of the moths that reside in my back garden, which will probably extend further afield with a mobile trap and use my land acquired permission in 2009.

All the best

Ben

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Mon 13th October 2008 09:41 by Peter Harvey
Hi Ben. You are aware I assume that there is a fairly recent publication (2004) The Moths of Essex, by Brian Goodey, which summarises the status and provides maps showing the distribution of all moths (micro and macro) recorded in Essex. This website here also provides maps of all county data submitted to the County Recorder, up to date to realistic levels. There doesn't seem much to be gained from re-inventing the wheel "to list all of the Macro Moths of Essex and state their distribution and abundance" without working with the other specialists who have already been doing this for a very long time?
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Sat 11th October 2008 14:05 by Ben Sale
Essex Moths Website
Hello everyone

I have recently launched my new website about the Macro Moths that live within Essex http://essexmoths.website.orange.co.uk/ its an ongoing project and aims to list all of the Macro Moths of Essex and state their distribution and abundance. The site is continually being updated and includes all recent catches from Hatfield Broad Oak using a 160W MBT bulb and home-made Moth Trap, how to build a cheap trap and take part in this fascinating hobby, a species database that is being updated.

If anybody would like to contribute and donate images of Moths that they have taken then please email me BEN@bensale.orangehome.co.uk and I will add them to the database.

Kind regards

Ben

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Sat 4th October 2008 16:40 by Peter Harvey
Colin Plant (author of the Moths of Hertfordshire link) suggests it must be an early instar of the Yellow-tail Euproctis similis It is a widespread moth (see species account for the species) and NOT the same as the notorious Brown-tail, whose caterpillars can cause a painful rash (although should still not be handled).
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Fri 3rd October 2008 10:14 by Martyn Everett
Can anyone help to identify this caterpillar found yesterday on raspberry canes, very close to both a hop and a gooseberry? caterpillar Copyright: Martyn Everett
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